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Lentils: Another Homemade Blended Formula Recipe

Lentils and Peasphoto by photobunny

As a vegetarian, I’ve known about the wonders of lentils for a while. Not only are they delicious (especially in a soup or stew), but they also provide a powerhouse of nutrition high in protein, calorie dense and balanced out with a healthy dose of carbs. Armed with this knowledge, I decided to try a recipe for Jenna’s homemade formula using lentils. Here’s what I came up with:

  • 1 c. Bob’s Red Mill Vegi Soup Mix  (green & yellow split peas, barley, lentils & vegi pasta)
  • 1/4 c. quinoa
  • 2 T raw honey (No children under age 1 should consume honey!)
  • 1 tsp nutmeg
  • 1 T ginger (read this, too)
  • 1 T cinnamon
  • 4 c. coconut milk
  • 1 c. goat’s milk kefir and here
  • 1 c. powdered goat’s milk
  • 2 T coconut oil
  • 2 T Udo’s 3-6-9 oil (read here for benefits)
  • 2 T Hemp butter
  • 1 c applesauce
  • 1 medium apple
  • 1 medium banana
  • 1 large carrot
  • 1 c. chopped spinach (dark, leafy greens are an often overlooked source of protein)
  • 3 T kelp powder read this also (especially for it’s iodine, iron & selenium)
  • 6 brazil nuts (for selenium)
  • 1 c. water

All my ingredients are organic from our local co-op.

Preparation is easy. I simmer the soup mix & quinoa in the 4 cups of coconut milk. While that’s simmering, I add all other ingredients to my Vita Mix blender and blend well. I add the mixture from the stove, blend very well (sometimes adding more water to achieve the desired consistency to pass through the feeding pump tubing) and pour into storage jars.

Nutritional info:

  • 2651 calories (30 cal/oz)
  • 112 grams of fat  (38% of total calories)
  • 90 grams of protein (14% of total calories)
  • 344 grams of carbohydrates (51% of total calories)

Good to know when making these calculations:

  • Fats have 9 calories per gram
  • Proteins & carbs have 4 calories per gram

I’d like to get the protein percentage a little higher and will probably do so by using more of the lentil soup mix the next time. BUT, even though the percentage of protein for the overall mixture is not as high as I’d like, I calculated what she consumes in a day and found that she’s still getting the 18 g/day recommended for her age and weight.

Happy cooking! Happy feeding!

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Peanut Butter Chocolate Dream Pie

Ganache:

  • 8 oz. semi sweet chocolate chips
  • 3/4 c. heavy cream

Heat in a double boiler, stirring constantly until melted & smooth. Pour into 2 small graham cracker crusts and chill until firm.

Filling:

  • 1 lb. cream cheese
  • 2 c. sugar
  • 2 c. peanut butter
  • 1/8 c. melted butter

Mix cream cheese until smooth and add sugar. Next mix in butter and finally, add peanut butter.

  • 2 c. heavy cream
  • 1 oz. vanilla

Whip until soft peaks form and fold into peanut butter mixture until smooth.

Pour filling over ganache and chill at least 2 hours before serving.

Do NOT think about the calories & fat involved and ENJOY!!

Note: You can make one larger pie, but make sure you have a large crust. The ganache will be thicker & you’ll have a lot of the peanut butter filling left, but it’s yummy to eat on it’s own, like a mousse.

(Sorry about the poor photo quality, but really NO photo could do justice to the deliciousness that is this pie!)

 
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Posted by on June 1, 2011 in Random Fun, Recipes

 

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Getting Kids to Try New Foods

little kid eating a big hot dog - _MG_8863photo by Sean Dreilinger

I found this article in Kiwi magazine from Traci Paige Johnson, and I just had to share her three ideas with you! They’re fabulous! From this month’s edition:

FOOD ADVENTURER – Turn your child into a superhero (it’s better if you say FOOOOOOD ADVENTUREEEERRRR! in a superhero voice) by having her don special goggles, a cape, or whatever will lighten the mood as she takes her first bite of an unfamiliar dish. Kids are more apt to try a new food if they’re happy and relaxed.

THE REVIEWS ARE IN – Turn your dinner table into a talk show, ,with your child as the guest commentator. Hold up a pretend microphone and interview him: What does this new food look and smell like? What does it taste like? Does he give it a thumbs-up? A thumbs-down? A thumb to the side? Keep a chart with stickers to show how each new food was reviewed on each “episode” of your show.

YOUR LUCKY DAY – Bring one die to the table. Each person takes a turn rolling it: Whatever he rolls determines how many bites of the new food he has to try. Even if your child rolls a one, that’s okay: Try the food again tomorrow and hope for a six! The more times he tastes a food, the more his palate will get used to it – and start to like it.

I think Jenna would think all of these are fun, and trying all three will mix it up a little bit. I plan to start using these ideas ASAP. We’ll see how it goes. Fingers crossed!

 
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Posted by on April 19, 2011 in G-tube issues, Jenna, Special Needs, Therapy

 

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