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20 books that teach a global perspective

18 Jul

*** Great giveaway at bottom of post! ***

Beyond our 12 favorite books that teach positive behavior, we’re also constantly on the lookout for books that teach a global perspective. Some of our favorites are simply about other places and people in the world and some teach tolerance and peace.

Chopsticks – Berkeley

My Grandma Lived in Gooligulch – Base

Beatrice’s Goat – McBrier

Rainy Days with Bear – Hull

On My Way to Buy Eggs – Chih-Yuan Chen

The Mice of Bistrot des Sept FreresLeTourneau

Mama Panya’s Pancakes – Chamberlin

The Road to Mumbai – Jeyaveeran

A is for Africa – Onyefulu

Lights for Gita – Gilmore

The Usborne Book of Peoples of the World

Off We Go to Mexico – Krebs

One City, Two Brothers – Smith

Tales from Old Ireland – Doyle

We’re Sailing Down the Nile – Krebs

Tenezin’s Deer – Soros

We All Went on Safari – Krebs

Mini Stories From Around the World – Amery

We’re Riding on a Caravan – Krebs

The Boy Who Grew Flowers – Wojtowicz

Win it! One lucky reader will receive a copy of The Usborne Book of Peoples of the World($14.99) pictured above. To enter, leave a thoughtful comment on this post describing your favorite children’s book with a global perspective and why it’s your favorite OR why you want your kids to have books with a global perspective. Contest ends at midnight July 25. General comments such as, “Pick me,” “Great contest,” “I’d love to win,” etc. will be disqualified. You must provide a valid email address and respond to prize notification within 3 days. After 3 days, your prize will be forfeited and another winner will be notified. The winner must be able to provide a valid US/Canada mailing address for shipping.

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6 responses to “20 books that teach a global perspective

  1. Awake

    July 18, 2008 at 3:26 am

    Hmmm…well, my daughter’s perspective is fairly small, but so far, I think her book “Babies on the Move” (sorry, don’t have it in front of me to get the author) fits the bill. It has great pictures from around the world of people transporting their babies – via sled, slings, papooses, baskets, etc.

     
  2. Trish @ Another Piece of the Puzzle

    July 18, 2008 at 4:29 am

    I can’t say that I have thought about children’s books in terms of a global perspective, but I do think that it is very important to expose your children to many different cultures and backgrounds.

    I stopped by to thank you for your comment on 5 Minutes for Special Needs. If you hadn’t told me you were a new blogger, I never would have guessed. Your blog looks great and I have really enjoyed reading what I have looked at so far!

     
  3. Marie Letourneau

    July 18, 2008 at 8:24 pm

    Hello! I just want to say that I am honored my book was chosen to be on your list! I am humbled to be amongst some amazing titles. too! I love “On My Way To Buy Eggs” and own a copy of it, even though my children are now teens – I read it! Regards, Marie

     
  4. psychmamma

    July 18, 2008 at 8:51 pm

    Marie –

    Wow! I’m honored to have you visit my site! Thanks for stopping by and thanks for such a wonderfully fun book that I love sharing with my little girl!

     
  5. Amy

    July 23, 2008 at 1:13 am

    I have been a blog lurker since you began…first time poster, however. It has been fun watching you master this medium. Your blogginess is impressive! Thanks for all your great book suggestions. We plan to check them all out.

    So, regarding one my favorites with a global perspective is a book called “Ruby’s Wish”. The author is Shirin Yim Bridges, who is “Ruby’s” grandmother. It is about a girl who grows up in a very large, communal family in imperialist China whose one wish is to receive the same privilege of education that her brothers and male cousins receive. She works hard and her benevolent grandfather grants her wish. The illustrations are magnificent and Abby enjoys the story. The story is also a powerful one for me given that Abby’s birthplace is China and I reflect on the significance of the differences that exist across cultures yet the human spirit that connects us all.

     
  6. psychmamma

    July 23, 2008 at 1:38 am

    Hey Amy!

    So great to know you’ve been lurking! Thanks for “coming out” and for the compliments. It really means a lot. Thanks, too, for the book suggestion. Jenna and I will definitely check it out. It sounds right up our alley.

     

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